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prime minister did iran and u.s. foreign policy part of the conversation on this morning's "washington journal." host: he is teaching as a professor of diplomacy and international politics at harvard. thank you for joining us. you heard the speeches from new york and all the play and the dueling foreign policy points. what is your take away as far as each candidate had to say in new york? guest: first, it is every interesting that foreign policy and national-security issues have made a real comeback. they are part of this campaign, a big part of the discussion. i think that is a good thing because of foreign policy is so important to every single american because we live in a globalized world. president obama gave a very thoughtful, reflective speech yesterday. he covered a lot of ground ready focused on the middle east and the very tragic events that took place two weeks ago this week, the assassination of ambassador chris stevens in libya and three of his diplomatic colleagues. he also made two important points, that americans obviously want to show great religious tolerance for the
on foreign policy, and my opponents have a different view -- even on foreign policy my opponents have a different view. he says it was tragic how i when did it -- how i ended the war in iraq. i am going to use the money to pay down our debt and to put more people back to work, rebuilding roads and bridges and schools and runways, because after a decade of war, it is time to do nation-building right here at home. [applause] that is a choice we now face. that is what this election comes down to. the other side, they like to tell you, and they are going to spend a lot of money to get these checks for people who can afford to write a $10 million checks, and they are going to tell you is bigger tax cuts and regulations is the only way to go. now they are going to tell you since government cannot do everything it should do almost nothing. their theory is if you cannot afford health care, we hope you do not get sick. there are some companies polluting the air, but that is the price of progress. maybe you cannot afford to go to college. your parents will play a. that is not who we are. now th
tonight at 10:00 p.m. eastern. the last debate will have a theme of foreign policy. the carnegie endowment for international peace recently hosted a panel on the president's role in leading foreign policy talking about american influence, the changing international order, and more. among the panelists is a thomas friedman. this is about an hour and half. >> good evening. my name is david rothkopf and i will be the moderator for this carnegie endowment discussion about how the next american president should engage the world. this is a debate format it discussion. we have a terrific group here. on my right, we have john ikenberry from princeton. next to him as thomas friedman from "the new york times." then just a matter is from the carnegie endowment. then robert keeton from the brookings institute. -- jessica matthews and then robert kagan. i will open up with a quotation from one or two of the panelists and we will then have some interaction on the theme of the ". lanham alaskan questions about related issues. at the end of each one of these 20 or 25 minute sections i will look to you for
questions. people need answers. this foreign-policy mass, -- mess, he always watns transparency. host: you're in a swing state. are you seeing a lot of commercials? caller: i go back and forth between denver and the suburbs. when they go out and do the polls, they're finding out that they're asking more democrats and coming back with a 10 point lead. from what i've seen, they're trying to go back to the 2008 turn out. host: that was got from colorado springs. up next in oregon on the democratic line. caller: it's nice to talk to you today. thank you for taking my call. the media tries to interject their opinions into the politics of what's going on today. i do not care whether that is republican or democrat. i think the media has this about their ability to be neutral. one of the examples that i would give is to checked politifact. whenever they give up facts about the president and romney -- did he really do that stuff? then instead of coming back, if obama is not 100% on a point, they will find some way or some small percentage to show that he was not exactly a perfectly right therefore
branches right now? >> i noted in the survey of american public opinion on foreign policy which just came out recently, there were very strange attitudes of americans regarding the middle east. a large majority saw it as the region of the world's most likely to create stress to the national security of the united states. there is a general trend of wanting less involvement militarily, economically, and so forth with this region. along with what david said, public opinion and how voters and citizens feel about the involvement of their country in the middle east is another issue. >> i would like to enter with certain details. it is very tricky and a very important. they may have problems, but the european union will continue to exist without any doubt. that is my position and my belief. for that part of the world, we are talking about our neighborhood. and therefore, the stability there is for migration, many things related to that mediterranean sea. it will be our priority for ever. it is always in the attention of any prime minister of the european union. more intensely in the south, and
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5